Saint Francis de Sales said, ” Everyone of us needs half an hour of prayer every day, except when we are busy—then we need an hour.”  Let’s apply that to time spent alone with our spouses…41811685_523912908047043_8910421856171851776_n

It’s important for married couples to periodically reconnect by spending time together, alone, and I would say it’s especially crucial for those who are very busy–dual income earners, those with many children, or whose children participate in many activities. Essentially, if you have virtually no time to connect with each other during the week  save for a few sentences in passing, you need to get out alone. It was many years before my husband and I could go out on date nights, because we do not live near family and had very little money for a babysitter–especially with the amount of children we had. For years the only two getaways we had were Christmas present shopping and a homeschooling conference. As the children have aged and become more self-sufficient (i.e. less likely to burn the house down), we have been able to go out with a little more frequency, and are trying to do this about once a month. I can’t say our dates get many marks for creativity–dinner, maybe a stroll, and a drink afterward–but we’ll get there. It’s just so nice to get out, we could sit under a tree with a picnic and be perfectly content.

Our parish sponsors a date night for couples periodically, and we have not yet attended one, but I hear they are a lot of fun, and plan on attending regularly. Our children will not always be under our roof, and truthfully, we had very little time together before the children came onto the scene–another story for another day, ex-heathens and all. Eventually all there will be will be the two of us, therefore we need to be sure to nourish our relationship faithfully so that when the house empties–and it will–we won’t be asking ourselves, “Who is this person?”

Earlier this week I revealed that my biggest fear is that Our Blessed Lord would say to me at my judgment, “I know you not.” Let us never get to a place in our marriages where our spouse could say to us, “I know you not” and vice versa.